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homework, ask these questions of yourself and then demand answers from washington, because america is at stake. we're not talking about my america or my vision of america. it's your vision of america. what do you think america should look like? and by the way, questioning your government is not only important, but in a democratic republic, it is required of each of us, so, if you're somebody who watches television, scratch your head and say, that doesn't make any sense. this week, i ask you, sit down. write some notes. call a friend right now and say watch the program on fox right now. then, stand up and come follow me. hello, america. this week i'm doing a special series of shows. it's called "a new republic: america's future," but i don't know about you. maybe i'm the only one. i didn't have a problem with the old republic. this special is more aptly titled "reasonable questions for an unreasonable time." all these weeks we will cover these topics, president obama, but you will quickly see this isn't about president obama. it is so much more. we're going to talk about the left an
just did a dvd called rediscovering god in america which includes a section on washington. and i'm very intrigued with the extraordinary job that mount vernon has done in blding a remarkable education center, which i encourage everyone who comes to washington to go see. i would be very tempted someday to write aovel aut washington personally. i think washington's life is so amazing. he is such a personal odyssey in the development of freedom and he's so little understood, but it would be very daunting because washington is maybe the most complex american. i'd be pretty intimidated right now to try to explain his mind and explain how he operated. >> host: we have about 5 minutes left in our first hour of three with author, writer newt gingrich and also former speaker of the house and historian. we're spending three hours talking about his 14 books over his ceer so far. the next telephone call is from jacksonville, florida. you're on the air. >> caller: hello and thank you r c-span and congratulations to brian lamb on his presidential medal of freedom. mr. gingrich, you spoke earlier abou
. hello, americament i have always wanted to be a community organizer, yes, because i love communities and i love being organized. they are in such disarray! here is the one thing tonight, the community organizer in chief is transforming america but nobody is really noticing, and i think it's because they don't know what they're looking for. i want to show you a picture here. can you bring this picture up? i want you to look at this picture and then tell me what is changing in this picture. this is from the university of south dakota department of psychology, their website. this is a test based on a scientific theory called change blindness. it is a theory that i think might help explain what's happening in our country right now. actually, i found this picture on this website. i was doing research this weekend and brought it down to about ten different people at my house, and oh, yeah, i'm usually on psychology websites. i do a lot of self-checking. anyway, in visual perception, "change blindness" occurs when a person is viewing a visual scene and fails to detect large changes in that
talking about what is america trance forming to? oligarh-huh? what's missing? show the chalkboard from earlier this week. oh, that's the word that's missing. hang on just a second. so what we were missing yesterday was czars! so the liberal blogs -- who is smart? who said that progressives just wouldn't get it? what they taught us now is that you can't spell oligarch without the czars. thank you. thank you so much. i appreciate it. you liberal bloggers, you need to stick around because i think you will be able to help america learn some more things. come on. follow me. hello, america. boy, what a week it has been. the president, he said a couple of things. he said you want to understand what i'm going to do and what my policies are, you got to look to the people around me. ok. we have done that all week. he said he was going to fundamentally transform america. oh, he's doing that. since january 20, he has been racing full steam ahead towards the transformation of america. but what is it we're transforming >> into? this week, i have to tell you, i have felt fear in this country for a lo
, follow me. >>> this is a rehearsal, right, we're not really on the air?'rn okay, good. hello, america. i always wanted to be a a community organizer because ibu love communities and i love one being organized, they are in! such disarray. the community organizer in chief is transforming america but nobody is really noticing and i think it is because theyi don't know what they are looking for. th i want to show youey ano pwictu here. bring this picture up. ca i want you to loon ykou at thio picture and tell me what ispic changing in this picture. this it from the university ofv south dakota department of dak psychology, their website.ir w this is a test based on antifih scientific theory called change blindness. a theory that i think might in help explain what is happening in our country right now.nd i was doing some research this weekend and i brought it down t to about ten different people , at my house, i'm usually on psychology websites. invisual perception, change blindness is a phenomena that s occurs when a person is viewine a visual scene and fails to detect large changes in the sc
, america. community organizing is all fun and games until someone starts organizing the community against the community organized government-run healthcare. then, it's time to start breaking some legs, you know what i'm saying? here is the one thing tonight. while the seiu dons their healthcare t-shirts, the tensions keep getting worse and the president is not saying much helpful. how about throwing us a bone here, mr. president? how about a little, hey, you know what? you guys should knock it off. i mean, if he was a parent -- i mean, aren't we going to for the nanny staith here? shouldn't the parent say something like, hey, you knock it off, and you, too! be nice or no healthcare for either of you. i'm just saying it might help kwell "it's just a g.o.p. astro astroturf mob kind of thing." oh, he is not saying anything because this is just pretend grassroots people saying something about pretend healthcare. they are not credible like those of us at seiu, you know, regular people that are in the neighborhoods. the other side would never think about running ads on craigslist to buy support
talk radio in america. now there are over 2,000. so you can't tell me that lifting the fairness doctrine was the wrong thing to do. >> host: let's get into the fairness doctrine. it's right here in your subtitle the new fairness doctrine exposed. let's go back a little bit in time. tell us exactly what the fairness doctrine was. >> guest: the fairness doctrine was an fcc, federal communications, regulation. 1949 it was established. it was established to force broadcasters to reach out -- to seek out to opposing issues on controversial issues. back then in 1949, there were only 2,000 radio stations in america. there were only a few fledgling television stations in america. and a glimmer of hope for a television network or two. there wasn't as much media back then. of course, we didn't have the internet and the diversity of media that we have today. it could be argued to some degree that the fairness doctrine was a fair thing back then because if you overloaded one media with a political ideology, it could sway opinion, no question, with the lack of media that we had back then. bu
priority and yes, i have read the bill. >> -- taxes. >> please don't yell out, this is america, this is memphis, tennessee, take two aspirin and come back in the morning. >> reporter: boos and cheers greeted ed perlmutter. proof people are passionate when it comes to health care reform. >> i just appreciate the fact that you're all willing to take time to come out. thank you for exercising your civic duty of talking to your congressman. >> scenes like that playing out all over america. and it's not only the crowds losing their cool at these town hall shout downs. listen to georgia congressman david scott get fired up when the topic came up at a town hall meeting just last week. >> not a single one of you had the decency to call my office and set up for a meeting. okay. then do that! do that! but don't -- don't come and take advantage of what these individuals have done. you want a meeting with me on health care, i'll give it to you. >> well, next hour, we'll tell you why that may not exactly be true in this case and show you much more on this very heated exchange. much, much mo
of a better america immersed from woodstock. he writes woodstock means little until you place it in the larger context of the society unravelling around the young adults. from their parents generation, they had absorbed rich idealism for social and economic justice. the piece by brett green and author in denver goes on to say, it was an interlude arriving in the context of more social and political upheaval than most americans have witnessed. it was a chaotic but peaceful interlude to a forthcoming breakdown between government and the governed when combined, it would end an unpopular war. i want to talk for the first half-hour, your thoughts, did a better america emerge from woodstock. the numbers ... twitter address is cspanwj. if you have called us in the last 30 days, send your comment via e-mail or twitter and give others a chance. >> what was it about the gathering, this carnival, this music festival that influenced your political evolution and did a better america emerge from woodstock? more from the denver post piece, a better america emerged from wood stot by brett green. he wrote it w
fiscal responsibility and addressing key economic challenges facing america's future. >> good evening. i'm martin savidge. >>> scottish officials were already under fire even before they made it official yesterday and allowed a convicted terrorist to fly home to libya to die. the outrage only deepened today after these pictures of libyans celebrating abdel baset al megrahi's release were broadcast around the world. al megrahi, of course, was convicted for the 1988 bombing of pan am 103 over lockerbie, scotland. the terror attack killed 270 people. and today, once again, many people were demanding to know just why had he been set free. this matter of justice is once again our "lead focus" tonight. >> reporter: abdel baset al megrahi should not be welcomed back to tripoli, that was the message, the warning to libya from president obama in america. the demand responsible for the deaths of 270 people, the biggest terrorist attack in britain was treated more like a celebrity or royalty changed into a dark suit, he was met off of the plane and then repeatedly hugged by colonel gadhafi's own so
. very happy to see all of you here. today's hearing will focus on insuring that america leads the clean energy transformation as we address the threat posed by climate change. i want to welcome our witnesses who will share their insights and expertise on this critical subject. we are facing two historic challenges in america today, a deep economic recession and the threat of unchecked global warming. during this hearing we'll examine the ways in which federal initiatives are already addressing both of these challenges. and about additional steps we can take to provide incentives for clean energy development to transform the american economy. this country can and should be a leader of the clean energy revolution. clean energy and climate legislation provides the certainty that companies need and the signal businesses are looking for to mobilize capital and harness the greatest source of power we have in this great country, american ingenuity. clean energy legislation is jobs legislation by creating powerful incentives for clean energy it will create millions of new jobs in america, it'll
will never tell ahe lie. will well, all right, i mean really. hello, america. at the end of the sixth month c we all read this, president obama looked at all that is at cryiated and said it is very good and so declared the 7th month a month of rest. yes, our ma xiia is going on or vacation. here is the one think. vacation. barack obama needs a vacation. he must be tired.rackama he spent the last six months transforming our country andthe most people won't either admits it or recognize it.st p he told us he would do it and r he is.pu give me the next few minutes and put your politics aside. open up your ears and your eyeh and watch with a purchase d perspective. don't be in denial,l. do not pn your head in the sand.if i if i'm wrong'm you are more thn welcome to show me where i'm missing it. mis i would love to be wrong this. barack obama has revealed his game plan to transform americat the transformation was marketed to america as change and boy,o, was america just eager forea change. for change. >> i want change whatever happens. i won't have to worry about putting gas in my car. i won't hav
is extraordinary. >> america's allies sound a health care warming. -- warning. a prom meant republican raises eyebrows in yea. an ann coulter on our american panel. we've seen a lot of outrageous behavior from politicians at town halls this week. but this morning, texas representative sheila jackson lee took the disrespect to a new level, making a cell phone call while a cancer survivor asked a question. in this video, you can sele raising the phone to her ear and lowering it back down again. i think blatant disregard like that is a first, it didn't go unnoticed. take a look at how people in the audience reacted, this video has been circulating on youtube all day. >> [beep] >> seriously. really? come on. >> it's ok. >> if our conscience allow, congress' conscience allows them to -- do you think that -- sean: the congresswoman said she merely dialed president obama's health care hotline to get an answer for her constituents that sounds like she came really prepared. joining me to discuss all of this is author of "the culture of corruption" are which remains number one on "the new york times" l
sally's, stand up, and come follow me. hello, america. i don't know about you, but i have always wanted to be in the mob, and now that i am, it's fantastic! the cocaine, the women, the town hall healthcare protests. i don't remember seeing any of those in those great mob movies, but here's the one thing tonight, this is not a g.o.p. mob or manufactured anger in america. what is happening is negotiating, democrats, republican and independents, senses in their guts that something is not right, and something isn't right with the healthcare plan. the polls reflect that. 65% say obama is taking on too many issues. his approval is at 50%, now worst than bush's was after the first six months. he has fallen 7 points with independents. 52% oppose how he is handling healthcare. 39% approve. more than three out of four think his plan will add to the deficit. that is important. listen to it again. three out of four think this plan will add to the deficit. remember that stat. why the decline? america, i think it's because you know something is wrong when somebody tries to rush you, that's when you n
, and remember, you question with boldness! come on, follow me. hello, america. we have some more questions for you tonight. i believe, just so you know going in that this is probably the most controversial show of the week, because you must understand the last three episodes of this show to be able to see and come to a place where you can believe that these crazy things may actually be happening. i want you to know, i hope these things are not happening. i hope that there is some other explanation, but i needed you to see who is advising the president earlier this week and what they are doing and who they are before i could ask you to look at this phrase from barack obama and think that the president of the united states literally means this. >> we cannot continue to rely only on our military in order to achieve the national security objectives that we set. we've got to have a civilian national security force that's just as powerful, just as strong, just as well funded. glenn: i mean, i don't know how anybody is going to respond to the facts that i'm going to present tonight, because quite
is the day i break my diet. oh, this job. how do i work with these conditions? hello, america. i have decided, because i saw the president's town hall meeting -- oh, it was rivetting. i think i have to change my thinking around this healthcare bill, because now, all of a sudden, reputable doctors are showing up to town halls, like totally reputable doctors, like totally showing their support for obama-care. >> your name? >> we're position is that we are like so for treating preventable conditions. how will it help me as a p.d.p.? >> first of all, give her a hand, because she is a primary care physician. [applause] how long have you been practicing? >> four years. >> give her another hand! glenn: i got to tell you, that was like so awesome, she was just like, there, i mean, she was like, i'm a doctor and i have doctor-like questions. that was great, and then, finally, a town haller, without that pesky cell phone interrupting sheila. it was great. i loved how sheila was spontaneous, you know, give sheila a little loving. it was great. it was unscripted. it was almost a pure moment. sheila jacks
neighbor and mr. obama fri has to go to the fifth summit of the americas and in trinidad and he has already been told by the mexican the and especially the brazilian president, lula da silva, he was going to run into some really heavy criticism in trinidad if something can't be done for the embargo. so they're still a long way to go. it could go fast, it could go slow and in his miami speech last may candidate obama suggested it was going to go slow. he promised to keep the rest of the embargo he said because united states needed to be a relentless advocate of democracy, and of quote. but slowly or quickly is very clear that our current dysfunctional policy is coming to the end of its life. what do i mean by dysfunctional? i mean that the united states and cuba have not had formal relations since january feared, 1961. that was e leffinge presidents ago -- 11 presidents ago. in contrast the u.s. estrangement from this movie gets revolution after the bolshevik revolution and is a strain from the people's republic of china after the fall of chang that lasted 16, 22 years respectively. the five
everything because they have no cars. captions paid for by abc, inc. >>> good morning, america. it is saturday, august 29th. good morning, kate. >> good morning, bill. we're here at the jfk presidential library in boston. senator ted kennedy lies in repose behind me in this building. we're told family members at this hour are getting ready at their hotel to come here. a senate delegation will come here, as well. they will all pay their last respects. and we'll have coverage of the senator's journey to his final resting place. we'll talk to one of his nephews about his legacy. and some of his former staffers, like supreme court justice stephen breyer, who said working for ted kennedy was like a family. we know you have more, bill? >> we do. >>> we have more on that shocking story. jaycee lee dugard, held for 18 years. we're learning details of her ordeal, including reports that the neighbors voiced some concerns three years ago. but investigators never made it past the front porch. >>> and also, another story out of california. everything must go. that is, if it's government pro
for growth and prosperity in the long run. these are the jobs futuring of america, renovating schools and hospitals. the elkhart area has seen the benefits. dozens were employed to resurface the runway at elkhart airport. a four mile stretch of highway is being upgrade order u.s. 33. the health center has received recovery dollars to expand services and hire additional staff. and as part of the recovery plan, we're making an historic amendment to innovation. building a new smart grid that carries electricity from coast to coast, laying down broad band lines and high speed rail lines, and providing the largest boost in basic research in history to ensure that american leads in the break through discoveries of the new century. just as we led in the last. because that's what we do best in america. we turn ideas ainto inventions. history should be our guide. the united states led the world economies in the 20th century because we led the world in innovation. today the competition is keen, the challenge is tougher and that's why innovation is more important than ever. that's the key to goo
hundreds. what's happening to the security america has spent and sacrificed to bring about? >>> how to measure success in america's other war in afghanistan. ares its first progress report. >>> we'll take you airborne to look at an extraordinary effort by the u.s. military to save lives in the middle of the war, welcome aboard an air ambulance. >>> and germany wants a million electric vehicles on the road by 2020. we'll plug you in on how they plan to do it. >>> from the world's leading reporters and analysts, here's what's happening from around the world. this is "worldfocus." made possible, in part, by the following funders -- major support has also been provided by the peter g. peterson foundation dedicated to promoting fiscal responsibility and addressing key economic challenges facing america's future. >> good evening, i'm martin savidge. >>> if you woke up this morning and turned on the news you might have felt a sense of discouragement about what you were hearing out of afghanistan and iraq. more than 5,000 american troops have died in those two countries since troops were de
charged with trading them. 150 years since the start of america's oil rush. we're now in the place where it began. >> then natural gas that is being developed in this country at this point and time may get us to energy independence. >> years after britain declared war on hitler's germany, a new exhibition reveals what went on in winston churchill's secret underground bunker. >> it is 7:00 a.m. in washington, midday in london, and 1:00 p.m. in berlin. the israeli prime minister is meeting german chancellor merkel. the country's share a unique history. the trip includes various reminders of the holocaust. two issues are likely to dominate today's talks. the question of the settlements in the west bank, which germany opposes, and what to do about iran, which netanyahu describes as a threat to israel. >> this is the last leg of benjamin netanyahu's four-day tour. it follows talks in london, during which time hopes were raised that there could be agreements on settlements in the west bank. israel is said to be ready to restrict construction. it may not be the comprehensive freeze that the ame
aspires which is the history of the kgb in america. i don't think he fabricat the homo book you should be careful because in the same way i was careful whether or not i.f. stone hitchhiked to massachusetts so you do have some files that say he had conversations with some when he may or may not have known was the kgb agent. you can say that with confidence that there may be these documents which may say yes, we do not know that because we cannot say them so let's assume that they do. what do we know? 1936 i.f. stone had conversations with somebody who was a reporter working for the soviet wire service in america. he may or may not have known was a kgb agent and may or may not have been friendly or helpful. in 1936 he was a enthusiastic fellow traveler and very enthusiastic of the american communist party and premise supportive of tough soviet union in so far was the only country that supplied arms to the anish republic. also he was terrified of the threat of fascism. in 1937 i.f. stone of became his name because he was terrified fascism might come to america and his family was targeted.
. >>> good morning, america. it is august 29th. saturday morning. and a who's who of american politics is descending on boston. th's where kate snow is this morning. good morning, kate. >> good morning, bill. senator ted kennedy lies in pose. a senate delegation will arrive shortly to the library where we are to pay their last respects. we'll have journey to his final resting place. we'll talk to one of his nephews about carrying on his legacy. and we'll talk to some of his former staffers, including supreme court justice steven breyer. and he'll talk about how he inspired them to greatness. i know you have more to come in new york, bill. >> we do, kate. >>> we have the latest on that shocking story out of california. jaycee dugard, kidnapped in california. held for 18 years. we're learning new details, including just how close the authorities came to finding jaycee, when neighbors had their suspicions. >>> and a different story in northern california. everything must go, if it's government property, that is. the state is in such dire financial straits, they're having a fire sale. comp
and missiles and on the heels of news that three more americans are now being held in a country america does not have a diplomatic relationship with, iran. does this pump up one dictator and embolden others? we're joined now by pedavid gern and peter brooks. david, i want to start with you. it's almost impossible to ignore the message that it's sends to north korea and others that may be on shaky ground with the u.s. the next time they have u.s. citizens in their custody they can use them as bargaining chips to talk with high-level people, rewarding bad behavior. how do they keep that from happening? >> erica, i think this has a more important message to the world, and that is that america is a country that cares about its own, it will go to great lengths, a former president will fly around the world to bring back two innocent brave americans to reunite them with their families and that individuals matter in this country. and this situation, we didn't give anything away. it's not as if there was a bargain or a negotiation. rather, we had a brutal regime that captured these two young women. a
. more than that it was a road trip across america and the 1950's it elimited what i became hooked on that i rd the clips and is the rocks a bunch of them and filed them away for futureeference. then i began to read your father's nemours and he wrote to a lot about it and his memoirs were very human, very funny he was wonderfully earth the and started to read other pele's nemours and i became the world's only khrushchev buff. i was writing for the "washington post" a few years ago and realize the 50th anniversary was coming and if i was er going to write the book, ihould do it now so i did and it is now and it is called "k blows top". the reason for the title is it is the third line of 33 line have died from the nework daily news it was denied to tour of disneyland, it "k blows top". he was not allowed to go there but we can get into that later. >> host: your book is very different because it is filled with political analysisdiscussion in trying toush this of the historic cold war and it was part of the khrushchev are in toronto and -- on to rise entourage. i was scared. [laughter]
: this is the national desk. they cover america. this is the foreign desk, covering the globe. every picture that comes into fox news channel comes through the media desk. here on "the live desk" those pictures will always be on the right-hand side of the screen. juliet: in the top box we are waiting for president obama to begin speaking in phoenix, talking about the wars in iraq and afghanistan, and as we wait, the health care debate rages on. the president last week said that a public option is an absolute must in any health care bill, but now the white house could be changing its tune. and an update on a story that we broke. e-mails from the white house going to people who never asked for them. now the white house is responding. in the middle box, a tragedy in the sky. fighter jets colliding as they rehearse for an air show. in the bottom box, hurricane season is in full swing. the florida panhandle is dealing with the aftermath of the claudette and now hurricane bill is picking up strength. trace: we begin with health care and the question over president obama's plan for health insurance is dead or
are the russians parking their subs off the eastern seaboard of america. also, cnbc regular, top name on banking why the "g-men" ought to keep their mud hook off bank of america's ken lewis, we're back before you can say government gone wild! >>> all aboard the recovery train. dennis kneale is driving the recession out and driving profits back in. >> i am selling the hope, baby, i truly believe this recession is over. >> you want a little optimism to end your day? yeah. >> there's reason for hope. >> he's the real deal. he's dennis kneale. watch "cnbc reports" week nights at 8:00 eastern. >> it could be the most important indicator, jobs report. it seems like the world will never be the same. but there is a light beginning to shine again. the spark began where it always begins. at a restaurant downtown. in a shop on main street. a factory around the corner. entrepreneurs like these are the most powerful force in the economy. they drive change and they'll relentless push their businesses to innovate and connect. as we look to the future, they'll be there ahead of us, lights on, showing us the way
. it was fought to make america be america for all its citizens. these were america's civil rights leaders. >> host: how would you describe this period in the 1950's to the young african-americans who only read about it through history books? and we should point out the year you were born, 1954. >> guest: exactly. what was interesting to me is i went on a book tour for "eyes on the prize" realizing how many people hadn't lived through this year, and this was of course than the late 80's and early 90's. so today it is overwhelming. most americans today, a quarter of the population are under 18. they have no concept. with a new is martin luther king is a hero or to be viewed as a hero, viewed positively although we get some younger people who think that he's just an image, they want a more militant figure. like malcolm x that would stand up, sort of the defiant black lace. then you get people who don't understand. they -- something like a colored blanking fountain, just bizarre or you get white kids who don't understand how recent so many of these indignities and limits in terms of education
-- to boost relations between america and of those countries. >> our team coverage continues with kate live in the studio. >> maryland officials highlight senator kennedy's accomplishments, the work he did, and the way he did it. >> i present to this convention, senator edward kennedy. >> she cochaired his 1980 presidential campaign and introduced into the crowd at the national convention. in a conversation on wednesday, she shared memories of her colleague and friend. >> ted kennedy had the courage of his conviction. he had such a great gift of working across party lines. it being willing to compromise without compromising his ideals. that is what he would want us to do now. >> across maryland, leaders pause honor his legacy. >> [unintelligible] >> from the moment of silence at the city hall to the courts in annapolis. >> my condolences go out to the kennedy family, the shriver family, and the towns and family -- townshend family. >> he said, i saw firsthand his dedication to build a society for america. it will be deeply missed. many officials called kennedy a hero and a mentor, including
of the difficulty of psychology of being black in america, he was the first person obviously to be on the court and understood right away that as he went through confirmation hearings and then just gone through confirmation hearings with briefing by to clarence thomas hearings and you think minorities and women very difficult and thurgood marshall's last three months and his intellect was question talked about was the smart to really be among the nation's legal elite and said there in judgment as a member of the court and when he gets on the court he really thought i must get the very best in terms of law clerks and assistance and what if the both of the idea that he could, in fact, handle this work and respond to the reasons assumptions. >> host: you also a great deal held this theory about how he was elected and also his conversations with lyndon johnson and doubt as to whether he felt it was clear to pick up the phone and call him. >> guest: i use that as the start of a book because in terms of building the narrative his experience in that moment tells you so much about the securities issues
to promoting fiscal responsibility and addressing key economic challenges facing america's future. >>> good evening. i'm martin savidge. >>> the quest for peace in the middle east has been going on for generations now, and it never seems to get much easier. we got that impression again today after another apparently inconclusive meeting in london between israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu and u.s. middle east envoy george mitchell. the two men and the two nations they reprent have been searching for months now for a way to resolve their differences over israeli settlements in the west bank. the u.s. has been pushing hard for an israeli settlement freeze, and the palestinians are refusing to restart peace talks until israel halts all construction there. despite their failure to reach agreement again today, the two sides will resume talks in washington next week. both men tried to put the best face on today's talks. >> we' headway in the past five months. my government has taken several steps both of word and deed to advance course of peace. and i hope that today and in the coming week
, or an awakening for small business in america, because it is being crushed and the government has blood all over its hands. the obama administration and both parties in congress are forcing socialized medicine right down our throats. they are frorsing unions to take over successful businesses, and the hijacking of contracts of workers under the interestingly worded employee free choice act. they're raising your capital gains taxes, and when that frightening cap and trade passes, energy prices are going to skyrocket, not just in your home, you but also at te small business. how are they going to be able to afford to pay their utility bills? small businesses are some of the fastest growing ones out. there joining me is a man who knows all about the threats they are phrasing. his name is patrick burn, c.e.o. of one of of the moment successful retailers out there, overstock.com. also in the studio audience, we have a few other people. we have james murphy and lindsay pyren, president and vice presidents of a small business in ohio called e.s.t. an an lit analytical that smalls environmental instrume
he did lives on. for his family, he was a bargain. for america, and he was the defender of a dream. -- for his family, he was of guardian. >> we look at ted kennedy's legacy as the leading liberal in washington. welcome to "bbc world news." , broadcast you our viewers on pbs in america and also around the globe. >> i am mike embley in london. 70% -- 17% of the vote now counted. president karzai edges against his main rival. and one of iraq's influential leaders has died in exile in tehran. >> hello. he was the best known as american politician ever to make it -- never to make it to the white house. senator kidney -- kidnapping -- center -- senator kennedy died after a yearlong battle with brain cancer. he fought for so many causes, and the tributes have flowed in from friend and foe alike. but his career was limited by self-inflicted wounds. adam brooks reports. >> the death of edward kennedy, known as ted, leads a chasm in american politics. hughes was one of the most effective politicians of the last century -- he was one of the most effective politicians of the last century. his
firefighters rescued them. >>> coming up on "america this morning," the new addition at the san diego zoo. >> let's say they already know the youngster has a good set of >> let's say they already know the youngster has a good set of lungs. ca help save a lot m of america up to 20% cash back from over 300 online retailers with our add it up program. just sign up and use your bank of america debit or credit card when .you shop online. it's one of the many ways we make saving money in tough times a whole lot easier. having to go in the iddle of traffic, and just starting nd stopping. having to go in the "middle of a ballgame and then not being able !to go once i got there., and going at night. i thought i had a goin problem. my doctor said i had a growing problem. it wasn't my bladder. my prostate was growing. i had an enlarging prostate that was causing my rinary symptoms., my doctor presribed avodart., (announcer) ver time, avodart actually, shrinks the prostate and improves urinary symptoms. so i can go more easily wheni need to go, and go less often. (announcer) ! avodart is for men only
their loans modified. lenders such as bank of america and wells fargo are called out for not doing enough. and ten lenders have not changed a single mortgage. >>> the s.e.c. is trying to ban a form of financial trading that benefits big wall street firms at the expense of average investors. so-called flash orders allow firms with high-powered computers to essentially peak at stock orders before they are placed. the practice has allowed those companies to rake in billions of dollars. >>> pepsico has struck a deal that will help it capitalize on changing trends. it's buying its two, main bottlers for $8 million. pepsi says it will allow the company to respond more quickly. >>> and procter & gamble can say it makes the official toilet tris of the national football league. they are announcing a sponsorship deal that allows the company to add a label to products, calling them the official locker room product of the nfl. >>> a new report might have parents of newborns crying right alongside their children. government estimates that a child born today will cost $290,000 by the time they finish h
. what's happening to the security america has spent and sacrifice to bringabout? >>> how to measure success in america's other warn afanistan. ares its first progress report. >>> we'll take you airborne to look a an extraordinary effort by the u.s. military to save lives in t middle of the war, welcome aboard anir amlance. >>> d germanyants a million ectric vehiclesn the road by 2020. we'll plug you in on how they plan to do it. >>> fromhe world's leading reporters and analyst here's what's happeni from around the rld. this is "worfocus." made possible, in pa, by th following funder-- major support ha also been provided bthe peter g. peterson foundatio dedicated to promoting fiscal responsibity dddressing key economic allenges facing america's future. >> gd evening, i'm martin savidge. >>> if youoke up this mning and turnedn the news you might have felt a sense of discouragement aut what you were hring outf afghanistan and iraq. more tha5,000 american trps have die in those two countries nce troops were ployed to afghanistan in the fall of 2001 and iraq in e spring of 2003. and hune
. this is a great book, singing in a strange land, the black church and the transformation of america. this is one of the great creatures in the history of american rhetoric. aretha franklin, arguably the greatest sound to emerge out of a human vocal cord, reverberating, vibrating, maybe the greatest sound made, some would say others. sam cooke, maybe sam cooke and aretha franklin. but everything franklin, ingenious was nurtured by her father, reverend franklin. i used to listen to this man every night in michigan. if you don't die before you get a chance to hear this man preach, you don't have -- the son sermon in the african-american tradition, of the greatest preachers ever. he ordained jesse jackson. he marched with martin luther king jr. in detroit, where king delivered arguably, even more impressive version of his i have a dream speech in detroit. got to show love to the home town, the crib. skip gates's book was here next to nelson george, where did our love go? nelson george is perhaps the most gifted african-american man of the letters of our time. what can't this guy do? he is a novelist
limbaugh will join me. don't miss tomorrow night's episode. from new york, good, america. [captioning made possible by fox news channel] captioned by the national captioning institute ---www.ncicap.org---^ bret: next on "special report" the president decides against the shakeup at the federal reserve. was dick cheney right all along about the value of enhanced interrogation techniques? we will show you the evidence so far. we report. you decide. you haven't heard about a terrorist plot against this country following 9/11. new details tonight. and democrats denounce organized resistance to healthcare reform. wait until you see what's coming this week. all that, plus the all-star panel, right here, right now. welcome to washington. i'm bret bret. on a day when a pair of economic forecasts paint a picture of exploding deficits, mounting debt andizing unemployment, america's top banker is getting a vote of confidence. major garrett reports on the p president's decision to keep the head of the federal reserve on the payroll. >> the man next to me, ben bernanke, has led the fed through one of th
for president but you could run for president. you have a lot of fans here in america. >> i'm a big fan of your constitution. glenn: you are one of the only people that i have heard in a long time that says you are a fan of the constitution. it is not real popular here in america. >> i'm not popular among all the politicians. look, it will make you rich, free and independent, and it as driven value to thest of the world so that the world owes you something. glenn: here we have a congress and president not listening to the american people and about to deliver us the universal right to medicine that is just fantastic in your country. tell me about how great universal healthcare is. >> the most striking thing about it is that you are very often just sent back to the queue. you turn up with a complaint or ailment and you are told how about october of next year or whatever it is, and you are not able to supplement your treatment, your healthcare treatment with any private money of your own. people who had conditions and tried to buy drugs independently, they were told that the health treatment would
and then continue? >> i agree with you. i hold no for much of the practices of the insurance companies in america. don't get me wrong. we have to fix the pre-existing condition situation and we don't shout at my town hall meetings. i agree with you. we have to address the issue of people with pre-existing conditions, people who are unable to attain health care insurance and we should do it through risk pools and it is going to cost money. go ahead. >> and the other thing is, mayo clinic that you talked about having good practices is one of the ones that president obama has cited as being the type of medical facility that we should pattern our health care reform on. >> they just don't agree with his proposals. go ahead. >> they suggest some of the same things that the mayo clinic is doing and i have some experience with the mayo clinic. my husband, who was on medicare, chose to stay on regular medicare. so he had the choice of going to mayo. i chose an hmo with medicare. i am wondering, when we have that choice with our government-provided medicare, why are so many people opposed to a government-p
celebrities as he could to walk in the parades and attract recruit. the best known black man in america was jack johnson. he asked to join the service but he was an exile in paris and they wouldn't waive -- they did name a show after him. jack johnson was the biggest show the u.s. had. this is james reese, one of the best known men in harlem. the ahead of the music union. they wanted to hire musicians for society ball, they called him. some nights he would drive around harlem directing bands five or six different places. he would recruit from the streets of harlem. also the conductor of choice for a dance duo, vernon and irene castle. vernon castle was british citizen. and james muir traveled with them and got famous because of them. vernon castle joined the raf. they served in the 7th and 131st and the recruiting office was around the corner the cigar store. this is the tree of hope people touched for good luck, and they marched around with broomsticks on their shoulders instead of rifles. hayward used his wealthy friends to buy uniforms. they were porters and elevator operators and ar
, visionary ? no, i have them. huh. the new lightweight hp mini netbook with windows and america's largest and most-reliable 3g network built in. only 199.99 with mobile broadband plans from 39.99 i am-- speechless, envious. wanna be me right now. getting one. are more than words here. it's personal. i have diabetes. rodney's kid too. so we're so proud to manufacture... the accu-chekĀ® aviva meters and test strips... here in the u.s.a. plus, we've proven you'll waste 50% fewer strips... when you use our meter, which means greater savings... for people with diabetes, like me. now that's a true american value. accu-chekĀ® aviva. born in the u.s.a. trace: we have been telling you a lot about the government's cash for clunkers program when government rebates to folks who trade in gas guzzling cars for more new more fuel efficient ones. in another state another cash for clunkers deal for years. this one involves something from your kitchen. anita vogel live for us tonight from compton, california just south of los angeles. anita? >> well, hi there, trace. the local utility company here southern
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